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TikTok Video Resumes Appeal to Gen Z

Back in the day, job seekers compiled paper resumes to mail to employers. That gave way to computer-generated resumes that could be included in online applications.

Back in the day, job seekers compiled paper resumes to mail to employers. That gave way to computer-generated resumes that could be included in online applications.

It seems that was back in the day as well.

In July, TikTok — a video-sharing social networking service geared toward Generation Z — began a TikTok Resumes service, where select employers invited job seekers to apply for entry-level jobs. Among the companies taking part were Chipotle, Target, WWE, Alo Yoga, Shopify, Contra and Movers+Shakers, according to Forbes.

Nick Tran, global head of marketing at TikTok, said enabling users to submit video resumes helped them present themselves in a creative way.

“As an entertainment platform that connects people through creative content and shared interests, we were excited about the opportunity to help reimagine a historically traditional process in a fun and entertaining way,” Tran said. “Regardless of whether we formally continue TikTok Resumes, we’re looking forward to seeing more creative career content on TikTok and how the recruiting industry adopts the idea of video resumes.”

Makaila Bolley, 24, of Holt said she wasn’t aware of the resume platform; however, hearing about it piqued her interest.

“After doing some research, they do seem rather interesting, and I do agree that Gen Z would definitely connect to this type of process,” said Bolley, who is on the upper age range of Generation Z. “Allowing a potential employer to experience you as a person versus you as a professional is a unique take on the traditional interview process. It takes the stress out of the interview and the need to be perfect.”

Brianna Seaberg, 21, told “Good Morning America” she took advantage of TikTok Resumes and had results.

“I got about 15-plus emails or messages across my social media or on my personal email sending job descriptions, asking me if I wanted to interview, offering me roles and freelance work,” Seaberg said. “Creating the video was 100% worth it.”

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